Category Archives: Crossmodal effects

“As a kid, I was fascinated by the display on visual illusions” – Vincent Hayward

What is the most interesting paper you came across recently (please provide a full reference)? Why? May sound silly but I got a kick of Adrian, E. D. (1931). Croonian lecture: the messages in sensory nerve fibres and their interpretation. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Containing Papers of a Biological Character, 1-18.   What’s your preferred sensory […]

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“What we hear and how we listen can influence our other senses” – Merle Fairhurst

What is the most interesting paper you came across recently? Why? Cecere et al. (2015, Current Biology) test and put forward an interesting and rather neat proposal that individual differences in alpha band oscillations modulate the temporal integration window. Testing the well-established two-flash illusion and combining EEG and tACS, the group show a positive correlation between the size of the […]

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“Vision might be special” – Ophelia Deroy (London)

What is the most interesting paper you came across recently? Why? I have been very interested by Fryer et al. (2014)’s recent study on speech symbolism where they used a tactile version of the famous ‘maluma-takete’ experiment proposed by Kohler in the late 1920’s. Kohler, and many researchers after him, established that certain speech sounds bias us toward certain visual […]

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Fryer et al. “Touching words is not enough”

Abstract. Since Köhler’s experiments in the 1920s, researchers have demonstrated a correspondence between words and shapes. Dubbed the “Bouba–Kiki” effect, these auditory–visual associations extend across cultures and are thought to be universal. More recently the effect has been shown in other modalities including taste, suggesting the effect is independent of vision. The study presented here tested the “Bouba–Kiki” effect in […]

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Levinson & Majid, “Differential ineffability and the senses”

Abstract. Ineffability, the degree to which percepts or concepts resist linguistic coding, is a fairly unexplored nook of cognitive science. Although philosophical preoccupations with qualia or nonconceptual content certainly touch upon the area, there has been little systematic thought and hardly any empirical work in recent years on the subject. We argue that ineffability is an important domain for the cognitive […]

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