Tag Archives: Audition

Vetter et al. 2014. “Decoding Sound and Imagery Content in Early Visual Cortex”

Abstract. Human early visual cortex was traditionally thought to process simple visual features such as orientation, contrast, and spatial frequency via feedforward input from the lateral geniculate nucleus. However, the role of nonretinal influence on early visual cortex is so far insufficiently investigated despite much evidence that feedback connections greatly outnumber feedforward connections. Here, we explored in five fMRI experiments how […]

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Ceccere et al. 2015. “Individual Differences in Alpha Frequency Drive Crossmodal Illusory Perception”

Abstract. Perception routinely integrates inputs from different senses. Stimulus temporal proximity critically determines whether or not these inputs are bound together. Despite the temporal window of integration being a widely accepted notion, its neurophysiological substrate remains unclear. Many types of common audio-visual interactions occur within a time window of ∼100 ms. For example, in the sound-induced double-flash illusion, when two beeps are […]

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“What we hear and how we listen can influence our other senses” – Merle Fairhurst

What is the most interesting paper you came across recently? Why? Cecere et al. (2015, Current Biology) test and put forward an interesting and rather neat proposal that individual differences in alpha band oscillations modulate the temporal integration window. Testing the well-established two-flash illusion and combining EEG and tACS, the group show a positive correlation between the size of the […]

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“Vision might be special” – Ophelia Deroy (London)

What is the most interesting paper you came across recently? Why? I have been very interested by Fryer et al. (2014)’s recent study on speech symbolism where they used a tactile version of the famous ‘maluma-takete’ experiment proposed by Kohler in the late 1920’s. Kohler, and many researchers after him, established that certain speech sounds bias us toward certain visual […]

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Fryer et al. “Touching words is not enough”

Abstract. Since Köhler’s experiments in the 1920s, researchers have demonstrated a correspondence between words and shapes. Dubbed the “Bouba–Kiki” effect, these auditory–visual associations extend across cultures and are thought to be universal. More recently the effect has been shown in other modalities including taste, suggesting the effect is independent of vision. The study presented here tested the “Bouba–Kiki” effect in […]

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