Tag Archives: Neuroscience

Jörntell et al. 2014. “Segregation of tactile input features in neurons of the cuneate nucleus”

Abstract. Our tactile perception of external objects depends on skin-object interactions. The mechanics of contact dictates the existence of fundamental spatiotemporal input features—contact initiation and cessation, slip, and rolling contact—that originate from the fact that solid objects do not interpenetrate. However, it is unknown whether these features are represented within the brain. We used a novel haptic interface to deliver […]

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Adrian. 1931. “Croonian lecture: the messages in sensory nerve fibers and their interpretation”

Abstract. The nervous apparatus which intervenes between stimulus and sensation has been the subject of more than one Croonian lecture. It may claim to be a suitable topic for a discourse on the “Causes  and reasons of the phenomena of local motion,” but it is a dangerous topic as well, since it forces us to consider the mind as well as […]

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“Perception is an active process. Art is about communication, not representation” – Chris Frith

What’s your preferred sensory modality? And why? I think I prefer combinations of modalities. Warm sun, blue sky, light breeze, the smell of spring.   How did you begin to be interested in perception? Learning about hallucinations while working in a mental asylum in the 1960s (and reading Aldous Huxley).   Among your recent papers which is your favorite and why? […]

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Vetter et al. 2014. “Decoding Sound and Imagery Content in Early Visual Cortex”

Abstract. Human early visual cortex was traditionally thought to process simple visual features such as orientation, contrast, and spatial frequency via feedforward input from the lateral geniculate nucleus. However, the role of nonretinal influence on early visual cortex is so far insufficiently investigated despite much evidence that feedback connections greatly outnumber feedforward connections. Here, we explored in five fMRI experiments how […]

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Ceccere et al. 2015. “Individual Differences in Alpha Frequency Drive Crossmodal Illusory Perception”

Abstract. Perception routinely integrates inputs from different senses. Stimulus temporal proximity critically determines whether or not these inputs are bound together. Despite the temporal window of integration being a widely accepted notion, its neurophysiological substrate remains unclear. Many types of common audio-visual interactions occur within a time window of ∼100 ms. For example, in the sound-induced double-flash illusion, when two beeps are […]

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