Tag Archives: Vision

Dokka et al. 2010. “Self versus environment motion in postural control”

Abstract. To stabilize our position in space we use visual information as well as non-visual physical motion cues. However, visual cues can be ambiguous: visually perceived motion may be caused by self-movement, movement of the environment, or both. The nervous system must combine the ambiguous visual cues with noisy physical motion cues to resolve this ambiguity and control our body posture. […]

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Vetter et al. 2014. “Decoding Sound and Imagery Content in Early Visual Cortex”

Abstract. Human early visual cortex was traditionally thought to process simple visual features such as orientation, contrast, and spatial frequency via feedforward input from the lateral geniculate nucleus. However, the role of nonretinal influence on early visual cortex is so far insufficiently investigated despite much evidence that feedback connections greatly outnumber feedforward connections. Here, we explored in five fMRI experiments how […]

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Ceccere et al. 2015. “Individual Differences in Alpha Frequency Drive Crossmodal Illusory Perception”

Abstract. Perception routinely integrates inputs from different senses. Stimulus temporal proximity critically determines whether or not these inputs are bound together. Despite the temporal window of integration being a widely accepted notion, its neurophysiological substrate remains unclear. Many types of common audio-visual interactions occur within a time window of ∼100 ms. For example, in the sound-induced double-flash illusion, when two beeps are […]

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“What we hear and how we listen can influence our other senses” – Merle Fairhurst

What is the most interesting paper you came across recently? Why? Cecere et al. (2015, Current Biology) test and put forward an interesting and rather neat proposal that individual differences in alpha band oscillations modulate the temporal integration window. Testing the well-established two-flash illusion and combining EEG and tACS, the group show a positive correlation between the size of the […]

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Levinson & Majid, “Differential ineffability and the senses”

Abstract. Ineffability, the degree to which percepts or concepts resist linguistic coding, is a fairly unexplored nook of cognitive science. Although philosophical preoccupations with qualia or nonconceptual content certainly touch upon the area, there has been little systematic thought and hardly any empirical work in recent years on the subject. We argue that ineffability is an important domain for the cognitive […]

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